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This page is for matters that the Rules of Court 2014 apply to. For content relating to matters that the Rules of Court 2021 apply, click here.

If you are uncertain as to which version of the Rules of Court applies to your matter, click here.

Note

This is the process to appeal against a civil decision by a judge in the General Division of the High Court.

If you wish to appeal a decision by another court officer, you may refer to:

If you are unsure who made the decision, contact the court to check.

Who can appeal

You should be a party in a civil case, such as the:

  • Party who filed a claim or an application: plaintiff or applicant.
  • Party against whom a claim or an application is filed: defendant or respondent.
  • Third party.

What you can appeal against

You may file an appeal against a decision made by a judge in the General Division of the High Court if you are not satisfied with it and wish to reverse or vary it.

For example, you may refer to the Fourth Schedule to the Supreme Court of Judicature Act.

Some common examples include cases where:

  • The judgment or order is made by consent of the parties.
  • A iudge makes an order giving or refusing further and better particulars.
  • A judge makes an order giving leave to amend a pleading (except for certain exceptions set out in the Fourth Schedule to the Supreme Court of Judicature Act).
  • A judge makes an order refusing security for costs.
  • A judge makes an order giving or refusing interrogatories.

Which court will hear your appeal

Civil appeals against decisions of the General Division of the High Court are allocated between the Court of Appeal and the Appellate Division of the High Court in accordance with the Supreme Court of Judicature Act.

  • The Court of Appeal hears prescribed categories of civil appeals which are set out in the Sixth Schedule to the Supreme Court of Judicature Act, as well as appeals that are to be made to the Court of Appeal under written law.
  • The Appellate Division of the High Court hears civil appeals against any decision made by the General Division of the High Court that are not allocated to the Court of Appeal, as well as appeals that are to be made to the Appellate Division under written law.

Before you appeal: check if leave to appeal is needed

You need to apply for the appellate court's leave (permission) to appeal if any of the following applies to your case:

For example, you may refer to Section 29A and the Fifth Schedule to the Supreme Court of Judicature Act for cases that require leave to appeal.

Some common examples include cases where:

  • A judge makes an order giving unconditional leave to defend any proceedings.
  • The only issue in the appeal relates to costs or fees for hearing dates.
  • A judge makes an order giving security for costs.
  • A judge makes an order giving or refusing discovery or inspection of documents.
  • A judge makes an order refusing a stay of proceedings.

Key facts

Refer to the following on how to apply for leave to appeal against decision of a judge in the General Division of the High Court:

When to file

If further arguments under Section 29B of the Supreme Court of Judicature Act does not apply: Within 7 working days after the judgment, order or decision.

If further arguments under Section 29B of the Supreme Court of Judicature Act applies: please see Application for leave to appeal against a decision of the General Division is filed before time begins to run (premature filings) for more information.

Estimated fees

Refer to this list.

How to file

Through eLitigation. Please see How to file.

What to do after you filePlease see After you file.
Possible outcomes of the applicationPlease see Possible outcomes of the application.
Common issues and points to note when filing Please see here for more information.

Estimated fees

The estimated fees include:

Item or service

Fee

File the Originating Summons

  • If the value of your case is up to $1 million: $500
  • If the value of your case is more than $1 million: $1,000

File the written submissions

No filing fees

Note: This table does not include additional fees payable to the LawNet & CrimsonLogic Service Bureau.

How to file

You may choose to file personally or through a lawyer. If you are represented by a lawyer, the documents will be filed by your lawyer.

If you are representing yourself, follow these steps to apply to the Appellate Division of the High Court or the Court of Appeal for leave to appeal. 

1. File the documents via eLitigation

Visit the LawNet & CrimsonLogic Service Bureau at the Supreme Court to file the following documents via eLitigation:

  • An Originating Summons for leave to appeal.
  • Written submissions (Form 31A, Appendix A, Supreme Court Practice Directions (as in force immediately before 1 April 2022)
  • A bundle of documents (if any) that are relevant to the application and that were filed in the proceedings below.
  • A bundle of authorities (if any). 

Note: No affidavit is to be filed without the leave of the appellate court. The court may also direct that you tender hard copies of the documents.

If the court accepts your application documents, the Service Bureau will inform you to return to collect the endorsed Originating Summons issued by the court.

2. Serve the documents on the respondent

You must serve the Originating Summons on the other party (the respondent) through personal service as defined under Order 62 Rule 3  of the revoked Rules of Court (as in force immediately before 1 April 2022). For example, you may deliver a hard copy to the other party in-person. The written submissions, bundle of documents (if any) and bundle of authorities (if any) must also be served within the same prescribed timeline but they need not be served through personal service.

After you file

The Appellate Division of the High Court or the Court of Appeal will inform you if there will be an oral hearing to decide whether to grant you leave to appeal.

If there is an oral hearing

The court will inform you of the location (if it is a physical hearing), date and time through a notice. Both you and the other party in the case must attend.

If there is no oral hearing

The court will inform you in writing of the outcome of the application. 

Possible outcomes of the application

What happens next depends on the decision of the Appellate Division of the High Court or the Court of Appeal:

If the Appellate Division of the High Court or the Court of Appeal grants you leave

You must file a notice of appeal within 1 month of the date on which leave was given.

If the Appellate Division of the High Court or the Court of Appeal does not grant you leave

That is the end of the matter. You cannot proceed with the appeal.

You should refer to the following table which sets out some of the common issues relating to applications for leave to appeal to the Court of Appeal and the Appellate Division of the High Court which applicants should take note of.

This table only applies to applications for leave to appeal filed before 1 April 2022. For applications for permission to appeal filed on or after 1 April 2022, you should refer to the section titled “Points to note when filing an application for permission to appeal on or after 1 April 2022”. 

This is only meant as a guide and should be read subject to all the relevant provisions in the Supreme Court of Judicature Act, the revoked Rules of Court (as in force immediately before 1 April 2022) and the Supreme Court Practice Directions as in force immediately before 1 April 2022).

Issue

Points to note

Grounds for application for leave to appeal against a decision of the General Division of the High Court

The non-exhaustive grounds for an application for leave to appeal against a decision of the General Division of the High Court are: 

  • prima facie case of error;
  • question of general principle decided for the first time; and 
  • question of importance upon which further argument and a decision of a higher tribunal would be to the public advantage.

See, for example, Lee Kuan Yew v Tang Liang Hong and another [1997] 2 SLR(R) 862 at [16]. 

When considering whether to rely on the ground of a prima facie case of error, applicants should bear in mind that this ground is generally not satisfied where the decision in question was well-reasoned and amply supported by the available evidence: see, for example, Virtual Map (Singapore) Pte Ltd v Singapore Land Authority and another application [2009] 2 SLR(R) 558 at [34]. Furthermore, applicants should state and explain how this prima facie case of error had a significant bearing on the eventual outcome of the decision in respect of which leave to appeal is sought.

When considering whether to rely on the ground that there is a question of general principle decided for the first time (“Question”), applicants should bear in mind that this ground is generally not met where:

  • there have been other decisions on the Questions; or 
  • the Question concerns an application of principles to the facts of the case. 

See, for example, Werner Samuel Vuillemin v Oversea-Chinese Banking Corp Ltd [2017] 3 SLR 501 at [47] and [48]. Furthermore, applicants should state and explain how this Question arose from the decision and reasoning of the court below: see, for example, Ho Soo Fong and another v Ho Pak Kim Realty Co Pte Ltd (in liquidation) [2021] SGHC(A) 11 at [8].

When considering whether to rely on the ground that there is a question of importance upon which further argument and a decision of a higher tribunal would be to the public advantage (“Public Importance Question”), applicants should bear in mind that this ground is generally not met where there is a “mere application of [a test set out in another case] to a given factual scenario”: see, for example, Hwa Aik Engineering Pte Ltd v Munshi Mohammad Faiz and another [2021] 1 SLR 1288 at [24]. Furthermore, applicants should state and explain how the outcome they seek in relation to the Public Importance Question also has a material bearing on the outcome of the main hearing of the appeal if leave is granted: see, for example, CLI v CLJ [2021] SGHC(A) 3 at [12].

Application for leave to appeal is made to the wrong court 

You should refer to Section 29A of the Supreme Court of Judicature Act which provides when leave is required to appeal against a decision of the General Division of the High Court in the exercise of its original or appellate civil jurisdiction. 

Generally, where leave to appeal is required, the application (via an originating summons) should be made directly to the Court of Appeal or the Appellate Division. Save for a case where any written law specifies the court from which leave must be obtained, please refer to Paragraph 1 of the Fifth Schedule to the Supreme Court of Judicature Act to determine which is the correct appellate court to hear the application.

The application should not be filed in the General Division of the High Court via a summons.

Application for leave to appeal against a decision of the General Division is filed before time begins to run (premature filings)

As a starting point, you should consider whether Section 29B of the Supreme Court of Judicature Act applies to the decision of the General Division of the High Court. 

Section 29B of the Supreme Court of Judicature Act provides that a judge may hear further arguments in respect of a decision made by the judge in the exercise of the original or appellate civil jurisdiction of the General Division of the High Court after any hearing other than a trial of an action, if certain conditions are met.

If the decision you wish to appeal against falls under Section 29B of the Supreme Court of Judicature Act, the timelines for filing the application for leave to appeal do not run immediately from the date of the decision. This is to ensure that there is finality in the decision being appealed against, before the application for leave to appeal is considered.

Instead, the application should be made within 7 working days after one of the following events (refer to Order 56A Rule 3(2) and Order 57 Rule 2A(2) of the revoked Rules of Court (as in force immediately before 1 April 2022)):

  • In cases where the judge hears further arguments in respect of the decision, the application should be made within 7 days after the date the judge affirms, varies or sets aside the decision after hearing further arguments.
  • In cases where a request for further arguments was made, but the judge certifies or is deemed to have certified that no further arguments are required, the application should be made within 7 days after the date the judge certifies or is deemed to have certified that no further arguments are required.
  • In any other case, the application should be made within 7 days after either: (i) the time on which the judgment or order was extracted; or (ii) the 15th day after the date on which the decision was made, whichever is earlier.

In cases of premature filings, parties will be informed that the timelines for the application will be held in abeyance pending the expiry of the time limited for a party to request further arguments.

Documentation and filing errors 

To avoid common errors, you should note the following:

  • As an applicant, you must provide security for the opposing party's costs in the amount of $5,000 and file the requisite certificate for security for costs, as required under Order 56A Rule 17(6) and Order 57 Rule 16(5) of the revoked Rules of Court (as in force immediately before 1 April 2022)) .
  • Affidavits cannot be filed for an application for leave to appeal without the leave of court.
  • As an applicant, you should file the application, the written submissions, a bundle of documents (if any) and a bundle of authorities (if any) at the same time.
  • If you are the party opposing the application, you should file written submissions, a bundle of documents (if any) and a bundle of authorities (if any) at the same time within 7 days after the applicant has served the application documents.
  • You should also take note of the prescribed page limits for the written submissions and bundle of documents which are set out in the revoked Rules of Court (as in force immediately before 1 April 2022) and Supreme Court Practice Directions (as in force immediately before 1 April 2022).
Written submissions do not comply with the requirements in the Supreme Court Practice Directions

When preparing the written submissions, you should use the correct form prescribed by Paragraph 90B(1) of the Supreme Court Practice Directions (as in force immediately before 1 April 2022)(Form 31A/ Form 31B of Appendix A) and make sure the written submissions comply with the requirements set out in Paragraph 90B(3) of the Supreme Court Practice Directions (as in force immediately before 1 April 2022).

You should also note that:

  • Written submissions should not exceed 12 pages, excluding the cover page and backing page.
  • Written submissions should include a party’s submissions on costs. A party should state the appropriate costs order and the quantum (including disbursements) which should be awarded and the reasons for it.

Appeal against a decision made by a judge in the General Division of the High Court

Key facts

Refer to the following on how to appeal against a decision by a judge in the General Division of the High Court.

Who can file

A party in a civil case in the General Division of the High Court.

What can be appealed

A court decision by a judge in the General Division of the High Court.

When to file and serve

In general, the notice of appeal in Form 112 of the revoked Rules of Court (as in force immediately before 1 April 2022) must be filed and served on the opposing party within 1 month of the date of:

  • (If leave is not needed) The judgment, order or decision
  • (If leave is needed) The decision granting leave to appeal 

Please note that if a request for further arguments has been made under Section 29B of the Supreme Court of Judicature Act, the time for filing a notice of appeal begins on the date the judge affirms, varies or sets aside the decision after hearing the further arguments, or certifies or is deemed to have certified that no further arguments are required.

Estimated fees

Refer to this list.

Who will hear the appeal

Judges sitting in the Court of Appeal or the Appellate Division of the High Court.

How to file

Through eLitigation. Please see How to file below. 

If you file the appeal, you are the appellant. The other party is the respondent.

Estimated fees

The estimated fees include:

Item or service

Fee

Security for costs

$15,000 for appeals against an interlocutory order

$20,000 for any other appeal

File the notice of appeal
  • If the value of your case is up to $1 million: $1,000
  • If the value of your case is more than $1 million: $2,000

File the appellant's Case

$3,000.

File the core bundle

$10 for every page or part thereof in excess of 150 pages.

Note: This table does not include additional fees payable to the LawNet & CrimsonLogic Service Bureau.

How to file

You may choose to file personally or through a lawyer. If you are represented by a lawyer, the documents will be filed by your lawyer.

Follow these steps to file an appeal:

The security for costs serves as a deposit for the respondent’s costs of appeal. The amount depends on whether the appeal is an appeal against an interlocutory order:

Appeals against an interlocutory order

$15,000

Any other appeal

$20,000

The appellate court may order further security for costs to be given.

You may provide the amount for the security for costs in one of the following ways:

  • Deposit it with the Supreme Court Legal Registry.
  • Deposit it with the Accountant-General's Department.
  • Via an undertaking by your lawyer.

How to deposit with the Supreme Court Legal Registry

You must deposit the security for costs either by electronic payment or by making payment at the Supreme Court (refer to Paragraph 26(6) of the Supreme Court Practice Directions (as in force immediately before 1 April 2022)).

You will need to provide proof of such deposit when filing your appeal.

How to deposit with the Accountant-General

You may pay the security for costs into court by filing a Direction to Accountant-General for Payment In via eLitigation. If you are representing yourself, visit the LawNet & CrimsonLogic Service Bureau to file. Please refer to Paragraph 26(4) of the Supreme Court Practice Directions (as in force immediately before 1 April 2022) for more information. 

If you are representing yourself, visit the LawNet & CrimsonLogic Service Bureau at the Supreme Court to file the following documents via eLitigation:

  • Notice of appeal (Form 112, revoked Rules of Court (as in force immediately before 1 April 2022)).
  • Certificate for Security for Costs (Form 115, revoked Rules of Court (as in force immediately before 1 April 2022)): attach the receipt for the security for costs.

You will need to pay the filing fees.

If the court accepts your notice of appeal, the Service Bureau will inform you to return to collect the notice of appeal issued by the court.

When: after filing the notice of appeal

You must serve the notice of appeal issued by the court on the other party (the respondent) within the prescribed timelines for filing of the notice of appeal. This means giving them a copy of the document in any of the ways set out in  Order 62 Rule 6 of the revoked Rules of Court (as in force immediately before 1 April 2022) .

    After you file

    You will receive a notice to collect the record of proceedings at the Supreme Court. You should read these documents carefully and consider if you wish to continue with the appeal. You may wish to seek legal advice on the merits of your case.

    The court will also inform you if there will be an oral hearing. 

    If there is an oral hearing
    The court will inform you of the location (if it is a physical hearing), date and time. Both you and the respondent must attend.

    If there is no oral hearing

    The court will inform you in writing of the outcome of the appeal.

    Tip: If you are unable to attend, you must request to change the hearing date, subject to the court's approval.

    Before the hearing: file and serve the relevant documents for the appeal

    How to file 

    File the documents via eLitigation. If you are representing yourself, visit the LawNet & CrimsonLogic Service Bureau to file. Please ensure that the correct document code is selected for the filing of all documents on eLitigation. 

    How to serve

    You must serve the relevant documents for the appeal on the respondent within the prescribed timelines in the revoked Rules of Court (as in force immediately before 1 April 2022). This means giving them a copy of the document in any of the ways set out in Order 62 Rule 6 of the revoked Rules of Court (as in force immediately before 1 April 2022). 

    What documents to file and serve

    To proceed with the appeal, you should file and serve all of the following documents within the timeline stated in the notice to collect the record of proceedings (refer to Order 56A Rule 8(1) and Order 57 Rule 9(1) of the revoked Rules of Court (as in force immediately before 1 April 2022)):

    Record of AppealPlease refer to Form 12, Appendix A Supreme Court Practice Directions (as in force immediately before 1 April 2022). 

    When preparing the record of appeal, please refer to the requirements set out in Paragraphs 87, 88 and 89 of the Supreme Court Practice Directions (as in force immediately before 1 April 2022).

    Appellant’s Case (including any bundle of authorities)

    Please note that there is a prescribed page limit of 50 pages for the appellant’s Case.

    The appellant’s Case must contain certain information (refer to Order 56A Rule 9(4)(b) and Order 57 Rule 9A(3)(b) of the revoked Rules of Court (as in force immediately before 1 April 2022). For example, it should contain:

    • the circumstances out of which the appeal arises;
    • the issues arising in the appeal; and
    • your arguments (submissions) for the appeal and authorities (relevant case law, statutes, subsidiary legislation and other material) that support your submissions.

    Core bundle of documents


    Please refer to Form 13, Appendix A, Supreme Court Practice Directions (as in force immediately before 1 April 2022). 

    When preparing the core bundle of documents, please refer to the requirements set out in Paragraph 89(5) of the Supreme Court Practice Directions (as in force immediately before 1 April 2022). In particular, note that the contents of the core bundle of documents must be arranged in the following separate volumes and filed as separate documents:

    • Volume I – A copy of the grounds of the judgment or order, the judgment or order appealed from and an index of the documents included.
    • Volume II – All other documents referred to in Order 56A Rule 9(8)(3) or Order 57 Rule 9(2A) (as the case may be) of the revoked Rules of Court (as in force immediately before 1 April 2022) and an index of the documents included.
    A fee of $10 is payable for every page in excess of 150 pages.
    Appeals Information Sheet

    This is to be completed using Form 27, Appendix A, Supreme Court Practice Directions (as in force immediately before 1 April 2022) and is to be filed and served along with the appellant’s Case.

     

    Points to note for appeals

    You should refer to the following table which sets out points that you should take note of. This is only meant as a guide and should be read subject to all the relevant provisions in the revoked Rules of Court (as in force immediately before 1 April 2022) and the Supreme Court Practice Directions (as in force immediately before 1 April 2022).


    Formatting requirements

    Please refer to Paragraphs 87(4A) and 90(4) of the Supreme Court Practice Directions (as in force immediately before 1 April 2022) for the formatting requirements for written Cases and skeletal arguments:

    • the minimum font size to be used is Times New Roman 12 or its equivalent;
    • the print of every page must be double-spaced; and
    • every page must have a margin on all 4 sides, each of at least 35 mm in width.

    Electronic filing

    Save for the following documents, alldocuments that are required to be filed are to be electronically filed througheLitigation by the relevant deadlines:

    • The record of appeal does not have to be filed electronically. However, if you choose not to file the record of appeal electronically, you are required to file the form of the record of appeal in Form 12, Appendix A, Supreme Court Practice Directions (as in force immediately before 1 April 2022). A soft copy of the record of appeal in Portable Document Format (PDF) in a CD-ROM must be tendered to the Registry.
    • The core bundle does not have to be filed electronically. However, if you choose not to file the core bundle electronically, you are required to file the form of the core bundle in Form 13 or 14, Appendix A, Supreme Court Practice Directions (as in force immediately before 1 April 2022). A soft copy of the core bundle in Portable Document Format (PDF) in a CD-ROM must be tendered to the Registry and fees will be payable for any core bundle which exceeds the prescribed page limit.
    • A bundle of authorities does not have to be filed electronically. A soft copy of the bundle of authorities in Portable Document Format (PDF) in a CD-ROM must be tendered to the Registry.

      Provision of hard copies and soft copies

      Please refer to Paragraph 88 of the Supreme Court Practice Directions (as in force immediately before 1 April 2022).

      Skeletal arguments

      Skeletal arguments are abbreviated notes of the arguments that will be presented. The concluding paragraphs of your skeletal arguments should include your submissions on the appropriate costs orders to be made on appeal and submissions on the amount of costs and disbursements that should be awarded.

      Please note that there is a prescribed page limit of 20 pages for the skeletal arguments.

      The skeletal arguments must be filed by 4 p.m. on the Monday three weeks before the start of the sitting period within which that appeal or matter is scheduled for hearing, regardless of the actual day (within that sitting period) on which that appeal or matter is scheduled for hearing before the appellate court.

       

      At your appeal hearing

      The Court of Appeal or the Appellate Division of the High Court will decide whether to allow or dismiss your appeal.

      This is the general process during an appeal hearing:

      • The court will ask you (the appellant) to present your arguments for the appeal.
      • The court will hear from the respondent, who may respond to your arguments and present their case.
      • The court may then ask you to reply to the respondent.

      The court may issue a decision on the day of the hearing or choose to reserve judgment. If the court chooses to reserve judgment, you will receive further directions on what happens next.

      Possible outcomes of appeal

      There are 2 possible outcomes:

      If your appeal is allowed

      You get some or all of the changes you asked for, either in full or in part. The court may vary or overrule the original court’s decision, or make a new order.

      If your appeal is dismissed

      There are no changes to the original court's decision.

      Need help?

      The information here is for general guidance as the courts do not provide legal advice. If you need further help, you may want to get independent legal advice.

      Find out more

      Resources

      Legislation associated with this topic includes:

      Refer to Part XI of the Supreme Court Practice Directions  (as in force immediately before 1 April 2022).

      Related questions

      At any time before the appeal is heard or dealt with, you may file and serve on the parties to the appeal a notice to the effect that you do not intend further to prosecute the appeal.

      If all parties to the appeal consent to the intended withdrawal of the appeal, you must file a document signifying such consent signed by the parties or by their lawyers. Upon the filing of that document, the appeal is deemed withdrawn. If all the parties to the appeal consent to the payment of the security for costs to the appellant or the respondent (as the case may be), the appellant or the respondent (as the case may be) must file the document signifying such consent signed by the parties and in such event, the security for costs must be paid to the appellant or the respondent (as the case may be) and any solicitor’s undertaking is discharged.

      If there are outstanding issues relating to costs or other matters, the appellant or any other party to the appeal may make a written request to the appellate court for directions on those issues.

      Generally, filing fees are not refundable if the appeal is withdrawn.

      If there is consent between the parties as to the payment of the security for costs, the security will be paid out pursuant to the terms of agreement.

      If there is no consent between the parties as to the payment of the security for costs, parties may make a written request to the appellate court for directions on the disposal of the security for costs.

      If costs have been awarded in your favour, you may request the deposit to be returned to you.

      If costs have been awarded against you, the deposit will go towards the amount of costs that have been awarded against you.

      You will receive a notice of appeal from the party who filed the appeal. After that, you will receive the record of appeal, appellant’s Case (including any bundle of authorities), core bundle of documents and appellant’s Appeals Information Sheet.

      You must file the following documents within 1 month of the service of the appellant’s Case.

      Respondent’s Case (including any bundle of authorities)

      Please note that there is a prescribed page limit of 50 pages for the respondent’s Case.

      The respondent’s Case must contain certain information (refer to Order 56A Rule 9(4)(b) and Order 57 Rule 9A(3)(b) of the revoked Rules of Court (as in force immediately before 1 April 2022)). For example, it should contain:

      • the circumstances out of which the appeal arises;
      • the issues arising in the appeal; and
      • your arguments (submissions) for the appeal and authorities (relevant case law, statutes, subsidiary legislation and other material) that support your submissions).

      The estimated fee for the filing of a respondent’s Case is $1,000. (This does not include additional fees payable to the LawNet & CrimsonLogic Service Bureau .)

      Supplemental core bundle of documents (if any)


      You may file a supplemental core bundle of documents if you intend to refer to any document in the respondent’s Case or at the appeal, and such document is not included in the appellant’s core bundle of documents.

      Please note that you should not exhibit duplicate documents in the supplemental core bundle of documents if such documents are already included in the appellant’s core bundle of documents. A fee of $10 is payable for every page in excess of 100 pages.

      Appeals Information SheetThis is to be completed using Form 27, Appendix A, Supreme Court Practice Directions (as in force immediately before 1 April 2022) and is to be filed and served along with the respondent’s Case.

      You should file the relevant documents via eLitigation. If you are representing yourself, visit the LawNet & CrimsonLogic Service Bureau to file. Please ensure that the correct document code is selected for the filing of all documents on eLitigation.

      You must serve the relevant documents for the appeal on the appellant within the prescribed timelines in the revoked Rules of Court (as in force immediately before 1 April 2022). This means giving them a copy of the document in any of the ways set out in Order 62 Rule 6 of the revoked Rules of Court (as in force immediately before 1 April 2022). 

      Please refer to Points to note for appeals.

      You may file an appellant’s Reply within 2 weeks after the respondent’s Case is served on you if the requirements in Order 56A r 9(7) or Order 57 Rule 9A(5A) of the revoked Rules of Court (as in force immediately before 1 April 2022) are satisfied. The prescribed page limit is 30 pages. Please refer to Order 56A Rule 9(8) to (10) or Order 57 Rule 9A(5B) to (5D) of the revoked Rules of Court (as in force immediately before 1 April 2022).

      Alert-2 Note

      This page is for matters that the Rules of Court 2014 apply to. For content relating to matters that the Rules of Court 2021 apply, click here.

      If you are uncertain as to which version of the Rules of Court applies to your matter, click here.


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